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How Mature Bucks Use The Wind

by Steve Bartylla 1

Slipping into my hunting clothes, I checked the wind one last time. To be safe, I headed to the stand… more »

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Shedding Light On Nocturnal Bucks

by Don Higgins 2

Are most mature bucks totally nocturnal? Or is this an excuse that hunters use when daytime sightings of certain bucks are almost nonexistent?

During the fall, every mature buck in a given area will visit an active scent-post rub at one time or another. Younger bucks will also frequent these rubs when Mr. Big is not around.

Decoding Scent-Post Rubs

by Bobby Worthington 0

Last month, we discussed a variety of rubs, including velvet-shedding rubs and mock-combat rubs. This month, we’ll delve into the much more complicated world of scent-post, or scent-communication, rubs. Without a doubt, these are the most significant rubs to hunters.

During the fall, every mature buck in the area will visit an active "scent-post" rub or "community" rub whenever he is in the area. Subordinate bucks will do the same thing if they can get away with it. These rubs are often located near scrapes on main travel corridors or on the edges of openings.

Understanding Different Types Of Whitetail Rubs

by Bobby Worthington 0

What good old red-blooded American hunter’s pulse does not quicken when he hears these words whispered in the fall woods? Like scrapes, rubs are one of the most exciting and informative types of sign left by a buck in the fall woods. But in order to benefit from what rubs can tell us, we’ve got to be able to understand them.

The author's trail camera captured this buck late in the 2006 season. On the day this photo was taken, the buck visited this scrape four different times during daylight hours. Don thinks the buck may gross well over 170 inches.

Making Sense of Mock Scrapes

by Don Higgins 0

Being a successful trophy hunter means being open-minded to new ideas. In this story, the author shares his experience with a mock-scrape technique learned from two other experts that produces results.

Mature bucks are constantly looking for danger, every day, 365 days a year, and their noses represent their best line of defense. As hunters, we need to learn how to capitalize on those unconscious habits that mature bucks have in regard to their phenomenal scenting abilities.

How A Buck Uses His Nose To Detect Danger

by Don Higgins 0

Mature bucks use their noses in ways that hunters often fail to understand, and this lack of understanding comes with a heavy price. By learning as much as we can about the way bucks use the “scent factor” as a survival tool, we might just increase our odds of filling a tag.

The author believes that scrapes are made by rutting bucks as a place where does in heat can come together with rutting bucks. Furthermore, the author believes that the age of a buck determines what kind of scrape he will make. In other words, there is a significant difference in a scrape made by a 1 1/2-year-old "youngster" and one made by a 5 1/2-year-old "bull of the woods," like the one depicted in this illustration. Illustration titled "Who's Been Here?" by Brian Kuether, courtesy of Northern Promotions, Inc. For information on this print, visit www.northernpromotions.com.

A Closer Look at Whitetail Scrapes

by Bobby Worthington 0

Often spoken in the fall woods, these words can make your heart skip a beat. But what does that scrape really mean to you the hunter? Here we take an in-depth look at scrapes and their purpose.

Talk about making the right move! On Oct. 1, 2005, Ohio’s archery opener, author Mike Rex correctly second-guessed this 218 6/8-inch non-typical megabuck and closed the deal with a perfect shot.

Mind Games: How To Outthink A Trophy Buck

by Mike Rex 0

If you can correctly second-guess that cagey old buck you’re after, you may be well on your way toward winning the contest. But how do you actually get inside his head? Veteran bowhunter Mike Rex shares some invaluable insight.

This giant buck gave the author the slip but later paid for his tolerance of human activity. Tom Kovach arrowed him. Photo courtesy of Tom Indrebo

What Will Your Deer Tolerate?

by Steve Bartylla 0

Understanding what local deer will and won’t tolerate in terms of human disturbance will give you a huge edge in developing a game plan for fall.

Guide Chuck Booth (right) and the author made a long, tense stalk of this buck on the Herbst Ranch in Texas. The men spotted the 9-pointer and several other bucks in pursuit of a doe, and a shot eventually was offered. Few other forms of whitetail hunting can match this for sheer drama. Photo by Dr. James C. Kroll.

Crashing A Whitetail Breeding Party

by Gordon Whittington 0

When multiple bucks start circling around a “hot” doe, the trophy hunter is treated to one of the most exciting — and potentially most productive — events of the entire deer season. If this golden opportunity ever comes your way, here’s how to play it right.

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