20 Best Whitetail States for 2014

20 Best Whitetail States for 2014

10. Arkansas

Arkansas may not have the big name allure of the Midwestern whitetail states, but this Southern gem still packs the deer hunting goods. Looking to see a lot of deer? Arkansas has a top tier whitetail herd of right around 1 million deer.

Don'™t own land? No problem. Arkansas has some of the most affordable lease and outfitter rates, and if you'™re looking for an even better bargain take a look at the 6.4 million acres of public land open to hunters. That'™s more public land than just about any other whitetail state East of the Rockies.

Your chances at a giant whitetail in Arkansas might not be as good as they are in the bigger name areas, but if you'™re looking for an affordable opportunity to hunt deer, in beautiful country with plenty of access, Arkansas is a terrific option. And you never know, you might just score on an Arkansas hog like Rhett Butlers 194-inch buck killed in 2013.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $25.00; Non-Resident $300.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 3

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (1,000,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 9
P&Ys/Hunter: 3
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 6 (4.89 per square mile)
Public Land: 9 (6,400,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 3

Total: 57/85

7. Colorado

Here'™s one that will probably surprise many of you, except for those who have hunted whitetails in Colorado. While the Rocky Mountain State gets most of its publicity from big mountains and elk, it also holds an ever increasing population of whitetails — big ones.

While the number of whitetail licenses doled out every year is relatively low, the number of Boone & Crockett and Pope and Young bucks harvested per hunter is one of the highest in the country. You shouldn'™t need to worry too much about other competition, as hunter density is exceptionally low. Colorado does have plenty of public land, but much of the whitetail range in Eastern Colorado is private.

Still, permission and access can be found. If you'™re looking for a Western adventure and love the great wide open, a Colorado whitetail hunt might be right up your alley.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $34.00; Non-Resident $364.00)
License Acquirement: 1
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 3
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 3 (23,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 8
B&Cs/Hunter: 8
Hunter Density: 9 (0.04 per square mile)
Public Land: 9 (22,900,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 6

Total: 58/85

19. Georgia

Georgia is one of the most deer crazy states in the South, and with nearly 500,000 hunters the tradition here is strong. Luckily, there is an equally strong whitetail population to keep local hunters happy — there are about 1.2 million deer roaming the Georgia countryside. Georgia is also one of the highest rated states when it comes to the number of deer harvested per hunter, so your chances of bringing a deer home here are some of the best in the country.

In addition to numbers of deer, Georgia also boasts some big ones. Take for example Mikell Fries'™ 223-inch giant taken while still in velvet during the 2013 season.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 2 (Resident $19.00; Non-Resident $295.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 3

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (1,200,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 9
P&Ys/Hunter: 3
B&Cs/Hunter: 3
Hunter Density: 6 (7.5 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (1,700,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 3

Total: 52/85

20. Idaho

Idaho is a perfect example of what is great about hunting whitetails out West. Low hunter densities, plenty of public land options, gorgeous scenery and surprisingly good production of trophy class whitetails. If you take into account the relatively low number of hunters chasing whitetails in Idaho, the state'™s Pope and Young buck production per hunter is actually higher than the more popular whitetail states such as Michigan and Pennsylvania.

If you'™re looking for an example of big Idaho whitetails, you need not look any further than Herman Lunders'™ 267-inch legend, taken in 1955.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $53.25; Non-Resident $456.50)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10): Deer Population: 3 (200,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 3
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 9 (0.6 per square mile)
Public Land: 9 (53,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 3

Total: 51/85

11. Illinois

Who hasn'™t dreamed of chasing whitetails in Illinois? It'™s one of the most renowned big buck states in the country and it'™s got the numbers to back it up. Over the five most recent years on record, 273 Boone & Crockett bucks and 1,096 Pope and Young bucks have been entered into the record books here. Those are big numbers, only matched by a few other states. That said, concerns have been rising across the state about the current management of the whitetail herd, as deer populations and harvest numbers have decreased noticeably in recent years.

Equally as alarming — and maybe more so — are the high costs associated with hunting deer in Illinois. Costs to buy or lease land, especially in the most famed regions like Pike County, are some of the highest in the country. The average outfitted hunt here is also going to run you well over $3,000.

Despite these concerns, Illinois remains an absolute dynamite whitetail state, if for no other reason than on any given day there'™s at least a chance at seeing a 200-inch buck like the one Jennifer Weaver killed during the 2013 season.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $38.50; Non-Resident $474.25)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg Lease Rates: 2
Avg Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (800,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 6 (6.65 per square mile)
Public Land: 3 (836,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 56/85

4. Indiana

The Hoosier State has been steadily picking up speed as a whitetail state since implementing a one-buck rule about a decade ago. The result of this change has been a much older age class of deer, and a significant increase in trophy whitetail production. In fact, of the Midwest states, only Kansas, Iowa and Kentucky have produced more Boone & Crockett bucks per hunter in the last five years.

Unlike these other big buck meccas, you won'™t need to break the bank to hunt in Indiana. Non-resident tags are a bargain, lease rates are still reasonable and outfitted hunts are averaging under gallery=157,000 for a weeklong hunt. In addition to all of that, while in Indiana you might just run into a deer like the 170-inch stud that Richard Buker killed with his bow.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $24.00; Non-Resident $150.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (950,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 6 (7.56 per square mile)
Public Land: 3 (1,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 59/85

16. Iowa

When it comes to whitetail states, Iowa is about as good as it gets from a trophy hunting perspective. Over the past five years Iowa has produced a dramatically higher number of Boone & Crockett bucks than any other state — with right around 600 entries over that period. You'™ll also enjoy relatively low hunting pressure in the Hawkeye state. The downside of hunting 'œThe Land of Giants' is that it will cost you. If you'™re a non-resident, licenses are hard to draw. The process usually takes several years of acquired points, and once you draw it will cost over $500 for that tag. On top of that, land, lease, and outfitter costs are some of the highest in the nation.

That said, if you'™ve got the money to make it happen, hunting whitetails in Iowa is an experience you'™ll never forget. And who knows, maybe you'™ll get an opportunity at an Iowa monster like the 231-inch buck taken by Bo Russell in 2012.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $47.50; Non-Resident $423.00)
License Acquirement: 1
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (400,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 3
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 6 (5.25 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (360,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 54/85

1. Kansas

Finally, here we are at the top whitetail state for 2014. The great state of Kansas is a true whitetail mecca.

Ridiculous numbers of giant deer, miles and miles of open space, bountiful public access and a slim chance of bumping into anyone else are but a few of the many reasons that Kansas is our top state for whitetails this year.

If you'™re interested in getting a chance at a trophy class whitetail, this is one of your very best bets, as Kansas has the highest number of P&Y buck entries per hunter over the past five years. And on top of that you'™ve got early deer season openers, including an early muzzleloader season in September that presents an absolutely amazing shot at a monster buck. If you want to buy your own piece of whitetail dirt, average land values per acre here are some of the most affordable in the region too.

You can'™t go wrong with Kansas. Just ask Caleb Gillespie, who tagged a 208-inch behemoth of a buck during the 2013 Kansas season.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $53.00; Non-Resident $419.46)
License Acquirement: 2
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 3
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (600,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 9
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 9 (1.84 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (1,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 66/85

8. Kentucky

Basketball, horse races and bluegrass music, Kentucky is known for them all; but big deer should also be added to that list. Over the past decade Kentucky has risen straight to the top of the ranks when it comes to production of Boone & Crockett caliber bucks and it'™s beginning to gain notoriety because of that.

What makes Kentucky so special is that it'™s still an accessible and affordable state for the average hunter. Whether you'™re a resident or from out-of-state, licenses can be purchased without breaking the bank. For instance, non-resident tags are one of the better bargains in the country at only $260. And if you want to buy your own piece of big buck heaven, this is one of the best places to do it. According to the USDA'™s 2013 land value report, Kentucky ground on average is valued at roughly [imo-slideshow gallery=157],800/acre.

When it comes right down to it, hunters will want to head to Kentucky if for no other reason than the opportunity to get a shot at a buck like Jason Tuttle'™s 182-inch monster.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $50.00; Non-Resident $260.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 3
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (900,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 3
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 6 (7.42 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (1,500,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 58/85

9. Minnesota

With Wisconsin to the east and Iowa to the south, it should be no surprise that Minnesota is a terrific whitetail state. With an approximate deer population of 1 million and 6.1 million acres of public land, deer and hunting opportunities are abundant. Diversity is there as well, as you can hunt the big woods of the north or the farmland or bluff country of the southeast. Big bucks abound here as well, with just about as many Boone & Crockett entries coming from Minnesota over the past five years on record as Kansas or Missouri.

Despite its great location, substantial whitetail population and proximity to other whitetail destinations, outfitted hunts here are still a relative bargain with an average price coming in under gallery=157,000 for a weeklong hunt and a non-resident license for only $165.

If you end up in Minnesota, prepare yourself for some exciting hunting because you might just get lucky, like Michael Burgdorf did in 2012 when he killed his 193-inch Winona County buck.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $30.00; Non-Resident $165.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg Lease Rates: 2
Avg Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg Outfitter Cost: 3

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (1,000,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 3
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 6 (6.9 per square mile)
Public Land: 9 (6,120,505 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 6

Total: 57/85

14. Mississippi

Mississippi is one of the best bets in the South for a quality whitetail with more Pope and Young bucks harvested per licensed hunter than states such as Minnesota and Missouri. On top of that, Mississippi has one of the highest whitetail populations in the country — somewhere around 1.75 million deer. There is also plenty of public land hunting opportunity, with over 2 million acres of public ground open to hunting.

Without a doubt, Mississippi is a great place to be if you'™re a whitetail hunter. Charlie Threadgill, a 14-year-old from Noxubee County, was one of those lucky enough to hunt in Mississippi when he harvested a nearly 140-inch buck with his rifle in 2009.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $32.00; Non-Resident $375.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (1,750,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 9
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 6 (3.7 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (2,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 3

Total: 56/85

18. Missouri

Missouri has a lot going for it when it comes to deer hunting. Obviously it'™s located in the heart of the Midwest and surrounded by some of the most infamous whitetail states like Iowa and Kansas, but unlike those states licenses are cheaper ($225) and over the counter tags are easier to acquire.

However, one knock on the Show-Me State is that it has one of the highest hunter densities in the area, with nearly 10 licensed hunters per square mile. Despite that fact, plenty of big bucks are taken here every year.

Justin Holland'™s 2012 183-inch Vernon County buck is a great representation of the kind of deer that can be taken in this part of the country with the right strategy and hard work.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 2 (Resident $19.00; Non-Resident $225.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (1,300,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 3
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 3 (9.5 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (2,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 6

Total: 53/85

12. Nebraska

The Cornhusker State has been steadily gaining notoriety as a whitetail state, and for good reason. It is a Top 10 state in regards to Boone & Crockett and Pope and Young bucks harvested per hunter, and have one of the lowest numbers of hunter densities. This means you'™ll have plenty of solitude and low-pressure deer herds.

Public land is relatively sparse, but the low hunter density makes finding permission on private ground a solid possibility. Lease costs and outfitted hunts are also middle of the road, with an average weeklong guided hunt brushing against the gallery=157,500 mark.

Whether you'™re hunting on public or private land, DIY or guided, the great benefit of hunting Nebraska is that you never know when a monster whitetail like Kevin Petrzilka'™s'™s 203-inch state record might appear.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 2 (Resident $44.00; Non-Resident $290.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 3 (350,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 9 (1.81 per square mile)
Public Land: 3 (1,091,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 6

Total: 56/85

3. North Dakota

Here'™s the big surprise of our rankings: North Dakota is all the way up at No. 3. But it'™s for good reason. NoDak has an incredibly low hunter density, lots of hunting opportunities on public and private lands, affordable licenses and land prices. Oh, and by the way, North Dakota has lots of big bucks.

In fact, on a per hunter basis, North Dakota has produced the third most Pope and Young bucks of any state over the past five years on record. As an added bonus, you can also hunt these giants in North Dakota while they'™re still in velvet (the archery season opens on August 29).

All this said, one thing to take note of is that recent outbreaks of disease and tough winters have negatively influenced deer populations in certain pockets of the state. Before planning a trip here, be sure to call a local biologist or game warden and get some intel on the status of the herd in that specific location.

If North Dakota isn'™t on your whitetail to-do list, you might want to pencil it in now. If you'™re still not convinced, take a look at the buck Jim Castro Jr. took there in 2006.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $51; Non-Resident $272.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg Lease Rates: 2
Avg Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (N/A)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 6 (1.54 per square mile)
Public Land: 3 (3,000,000)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 59/85

6. Ohio

Bucks and Ohio seem to go hand in hand. There are the Ohio State University Buckeyes or, but more relevant to this set of rankings, the giant whitetail bucks roaming the woods and fields of Ohio. Few states can match Ohio when it comes to giant deer, and the record books can back that up. No states other than Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin have put more Booners in the books over the past five years on record.

But Ohio is more than just a big buck producer. It'™s also home to a healthy population of around 750,000 whitetails that inhabit a diverse array of habitats ranging from the farm fields of the north to the rolling Appalachian foothills of the south and east. Ohio also has hunting options for all budgets, as the DIY guy can easily find public ground and a $150 non-resident license is affordable as well. And if an outfitted hunt is your cup of tea, average prices fall in the middle of the road, too.

Any way you look at it, Ohio is a great whitetail state. Just ask Mark Owen, who killed this 256-inch buck during the 2013 bow season.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $43.00; Non-Resident $149.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (750,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 3 (9.93 per square acre)
Public Land: 6 (700,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 59/85

15. Oklahoma

Although it'™s ranked 15th this year, Oklahoma is still a top-notch whitetail state. With a healthy population of around a half million whitetails and a low hunter density of around 3 hunters per square mile, you'™ll have a great opportunity to see plenty of deer and few other hunters here.

Non-resident tags are middle of the road at $280, and so are average costs of purchasing land, leasing property or getting an outfitter. And while Oklahoma doesn'™t produce giant whitetails at the same rate as it'™s northern neighbors, Kansas or Iowa, it'™s certainly getting better in this category every year. Oklahoma is definitely a whitetail state on the rise.

George Moore'™s 2010 buck, a 203-inch 21-point bruiser, is a perfect example of the exceptional deer that Oklahoma can produce.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 2 (Resident $45.00; Non-Resident $280.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 3
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 6 (500,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 6 (3.45 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (1,700,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 6

Total: 55/85

13. South Dakota

Wide open spaces, big skies, low population and lots of dandy whitetails. South Dakota has a lot of things going for it, and deer hunting is certainly one of them. With a hunter density of less than two hunters per square mile, you'™re unlikely to bump into many other hunters here, but you'™ll definitely have a chance at running into a big buck. It might be surprising to some that more Pope and Young bucks per licensed hunter have been taken over the last five years in South Dakota than Ohio, Kentucky and Texas. On top of that, gaining access to hunt is no trouble, with over 4 million acres of public land available. One thing to keep in mind is the average cost of an outfitted hunt here is on the upper end of the scale, averaging right around $3,000 for a guided weeklong hunt.

Whether you live here or travel to South Dakota to chase whitetails, you'™re in a great place to enjoy the excitement of the hunt. Nikki Bauer can certainly attest to this, as she harvested this gorgeous 162-inch buck in Sully County, South Dakota.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $40.00; Non-Resident $286.00)
License Acquirement: 2
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 2
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 2

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (250,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 9
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 6 (1.64 per square mile)
Public Land: 6 (4,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 3

Total: 56/85

5. Texas

Texas is another state rich with deer hunting tradition and an easy pick for one of our top whitetail states. With over-the-counter tags, a huge deer population, and some of the highest harvest rates per hunter, Texas is definitely a place where you'™ll have a great opportunity at filling a tag.

The challenge with Texas is gaining access. Leases can be found at decent rates, but public land is sparse and outfitted hunts are some of the most expensive in the country, averaging well over $3,000 for a weeklong hunt.

Nonetheless, if you love big whitetail deer, you could do a lot worse than Texas. Robert Traylor'™s 254-inch monster non-typical is proof positive of that.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $25.00; Non-Resident $315.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 3
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (4,000,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 9
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 9 (2.45 per square acre)
Public Land: 3 (1,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 7

Total: 59/85

2. Wisconsin

There may not be another state in the country as steeped in deer hunting tradition as Wisconsin. Going up north to deer camp in Wisconsin is right up there with religion, cheese and the Packers. But tradition isn'™t all that the Cheesehead State has going for it. It also has an astronomical number of big bucks. Take a few seconds to digest this. Over the past five years on record, Wisconsin hunters have registered 2,088 Pope and Young bucks, which is double that of the next closest state.

Wisconsin is great for a number of other reasons as well. Take for example the affordable $160 non-resident tags, the six million acres of public land, and the huge whitetail herd of around 1.2 million deer.

The only downside? If you'™re interested in hunting with an outfitter, it'™s going to cost you, in most cases, well over $3,000.

Nonetheless, if you can find a way to get hunting in Wisconsin you'™re bound to have some great big buck encounters. Maybe even with a buck like Scott Hove'™s 212-inch giant!

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 3 (Resident $24.00; Non-Resident $160.00)
License Acquirement: 3
Avg. Lease Rates: 2
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 1
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 9 (1,200,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 3
P&Ys/Hunter: 9
B&Cs/Hunter: 9
Hunter Density: 3 (13.34 per square mile)
Public Land: 9 (6,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 9

Total: 61/85

17. Wyoming

An early archery opener giving hunters a chance at a velvet buck, minimal hunting pressure and a great opportunity at a Pope and Young caliber whitetail; these are but a few of the reasons that more and more whitetail hunters are flocking west to Wyoming each year to chase deer.

However, if you'™re planning on going the outfitted route, be aware that Wyoming has some of the highest outfitting costs for whitetails — averaging well over $3,000 for a guided hunt. If you do make it to Wyoming, though, rest assured you'™ll have a great chance at a quality whitetail, maybe even a giant like Shawn Coggins'™ 2010 buck taken in Meeteetse which sported an eight inch drop tine.

Score (out of 3):
License Cost: 1 (Resident $38.00; Non-Resident $312.00)
License Acquirement: 1
Avg. Lease Rates: 3
Avg. Cost/Acre To Purchase Land: 3
Avg. Outfitter Cost: 1

Score (out of 10):
Deer Population: 3 (60,000)
Harvests/Hunter: 6
P&Ys/Hunter: 6
B&Cs/Hunter: 6
Hunter Density: 9 (0.3 per square mile)
Public Land: 9 (55,000,000 acres)
Reputation/Intangibles: 6

Total: 54/85

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East and West Coasters jetting across the U.S. often refer to Nebraska a "fly-over" state....

In 1972, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) completed a gigantic project creating a shortcut United States

Tag A Trophy Whitetail at the Tenn-Tom Waterway

Bernie Barringer - February 22, 2018

In 1972, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) completed a gigantic project creating a...

The words United States

Plentiful DIY Hunting In Ohio's Wayne National Forest

Bernie Barringer - November 21, 2017

The words "national forest" generally create a mental image of large blocks of uninterrupted...

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